There is a strong tendency to overweigh the first piece of information that one comes across.

A further bias is the tendency to overweigh information because we are familiar with the source - Home Bias - or worse still, because we like the source (liking tendency).

In conjunction with this bias, are the ones that overweigh information that is easily available, or that is extra-vivid.

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'Thinking and Deciding' by Jonathan Baron:

Such an effect is called a primacy effect, because the first piece of evidence is weighed more heavily than it should be.

One explanation of the primacy effect is that the initial evidence leads to an opinion, which then biases the search for subsequent evidence, as well as the interpretation when it is found.


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Charles Munger, in 'Poor Charlie's Almanack', talks about information bias:

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Nassim Nicholas Taleb, in 'Fooled by Randomness', describes survivorship bias:

The mistake of ignoring survivorship bias is chronic, even (or perhaps especially) among professionals. How? Because we are trained to...

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