The process requires asking why, why and why until one can go no further - essentially trying to reduce to the more fundamental body of knowledge.

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In 'No Ordinary Genius', Richard Feynman discusses his ability to simplify:

But the game is to try to figure a thing out, with what we know is possible. It requires imagination to think of what’s possible, and then it requires an analysis back, checking
to see whether it fits, whether it’s allowed, according to what is known.

When you explain a ‘why’ you have to be in some kind of framework...


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Occam's Razor provides another approach to the 'as simple as possible' approach. William of Occam, a 14th century philosopher, said, 'Non sunt entia multiplicanda oracter necessitatem,' which translates to, 'Hypotheses should not be multiplied without reason.' In other words, look for the simplest answer possible.

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In 'The Nature of Science', James Trefil, the author, explains it this way:

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